February 2, 2001

Michael Jenkins
Seattle Dept. of Design, Construction and Land Use
710 2nd Ave., Ste. 200
Seattle, WA 98104-1703

Re:  Project # 2007096, 1816 19th Ave.

Dear Michael Jenkins,

I am a near neighbor of the proposed condominium project at 1816 19th Ave., and
am writing with comments specifically related to the alley, traffic and back appearance
of the project.   My house at 1811 20th Ave. is directly behind the project, across
what is now a gravel alley.

I have attended two meetings where information was presented about the project,
and am generally supportive of the design presented by Val Thomas and his colleagues.
This is clearly a very desirable development site, and I believe that the
 vision for the project fits well with the evolving character of our neighborhood.

My comments fall into the following categories:  1) alley access during construction,
2) paving of the alley as a project requirement, 3) back appearance of the
 project and pedestrian amenities in the alley, and 4) traffic congestion along
Denny Way once the project in complete.

1)  Alley access during construction:  currently more than 20 vehicles park in the
alley behind residences on 20th Ave.  I am concerned about alley access during
construction.  My experience in this area leads me to believe that project workers
will use and block the alley at their convenience, disregarding the needs of
 existing residents.  I would like to know what remedies the city offers to ensure
 that construction work respects the multiple uses of the alley.   I would like
 to point out that there is only one egress point on Denny Way, so that construction
vehicles blocking any part of the alley will effectively block resident cars.
 

2)  Paving the alley:  the current alley has an inadequate, potholed gravel surface.
A few years ago, a condo. project, Miller Mews, was built on the 1800 block
 on 20th Ave.  The developer of that project regraded the alley surface and with
 the financial support of other homeowners, laid down new gravel.  Subsequently,
the Miller Mews garbage collection truck has wrecked the road surface (all other
residences on the block have curbside collection on the street).  The proposed
1816 19th Ave. project will undoubtedly add another garbage truck to alley, and,
more significantly, will quadruple car usage along it as well.   Moreover, construction
will further damage what is already an inadequate road surface along
the entire property line.  I strongly urge the city to require the developer to
pave the alley behind the entire length of the proposed project and out to the alley
egress on Denny Way.

3)  Back appearance and pedestrian amenities:  at the early Design Review hearing,
it was pointed out that residents in the neighborhood will have a 360 degree
view of the project.  The Design Review board urged the developer to consider this
when designing the exterior of the building, with attention to interesting design
elements on all sides.  The parking garage on the alley is a case in point,
 and suggestion was made to avoid a blank solid wall, but instead to use plantings
and artistic iron grillwork to make a attractive appearance.  Over the years,
 the alley has served pedestrians, especially since it¼s one-end access has made
 it a safe walkway.  I urge city planners to work with the developer to keep and
 enhance the practical and aesthetic value of the alley.  This will benefit project
residents as much as those already here.

4)  Traffic congestion on Denny Way:  Traffic on Denny Way between 19th and 20th
 avenues is already in a dangerous condition.  Cars traveling west (uphill) on Denny,
frequently force cars turning from 19th onto Denny to back up into the traffic
on 19th Ave. in order  to get by.  Since 19th in a busy, fast street, this
is a perilous situation.  Every few months, there is some kind of fender-bender
or crash at the intersection of 19th and Denny.  In addition, there are two dangerous
visibility problems.  Cars parked on the south side of Denny block visibility
for cars turning out of the alley west on to Denny.  Cars parked both on Denny
and on 19th Ave. block visibility for cars traveling west on Denny as they turn
south or north on to 19th Ave.  While I am loath to decrease the availability
 of street parking in the neighborhood, I believe that the traffic load increase
 brought by the project will necessitate it.  Specifically, there needs to be a
red zone on both sides of the alley egress on Denny.  Currently there is a red *
no parking¾ zone on the east edge of the alley egress for one car length, and this
needs to be mirrored on the west edge as well.  At the corner of Denny and 19
th, the *No Parking Within 30 Feet¾ restriction needs to be added to the southeast
corner of Denny Way and to the southwest corner of 19th Ave.

I trust that the above suggestions will be forwarded to the appropriate city departments.
 If you believe that my comments would be better directed elsewhere, please
contact me with the appropriate information.  I would very much appreciate
 a response to the specific recommendations in this letter and their likely outcomes.

Thank you,
 
 

Carolyn Stevens
(206)324-8963
email:  zenquake@ix.netcom.com



April 16, 2001

Michael Jenkins
Seattle Dept. of Design, Construction and Land Use
710 2nd Ave., Ste. 200
Seattle, WA 98104-1703

Re:  Project # 2007096, 1816 19th Ave.

Dear Michael Jenkins,

I am writing a second time in reference to the proposed condominium
project at 1816 19th Ave.  My first letter to you on this subject was
dated February 2, 2001.  In that letter I raised several issues, and in
this letter, I want to follow-up on one, parking and alley access during
construction.

This is what I wrote to you in February:

Alley access during construction:  currently more than 20 vehicles park
in the alley behind residences on 20th Ave.  I am concerned about alley
access during construction.  My experience in this area leads me to
believe that project workers will use and block the alley at their
convenience, disregarding the needs of existing residents.  I would like
to know what remedies the city offers to ensure that construction work
respects the multiple uses of the alley.   I would like to point out that
there is only one egress point on Denny Way, so that construction
vehicles blocking any part of the alley will effectively block resident
cars.

I recently learned that the city can require a parking plan for projects
which disrupt current parking arrangements.   I would like to inquire
whether this project falls within the parameters for a parking plan, and
if it does, request that the city require the developer to implement a
parking plan for the project.

Thank you for your attention to this matter.  I look forward to your
response on this issue and the others raised in my earlier letter.

Sincerely,
 

Carolyn Stevens